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shabubu
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making sushi @ home

so, i've read that a few people here have made sushi at home...

i have been interested in this for a while. i love sushi like chris hansen loves catching pedophiles. the thing is, i have no idea where to start.

i know the basics: rice is insanely important, so is nori (the seaweed), you need a sharp knife and a rolling mat... but i have no fucking idea what brand is good for sushi rice or for the nori, and what's the best way to prepare them

so, if you have some experience in this area, i would like to ask you for any of the following:

-brand recommendations
-rice recipes
-sushi kit suggestions
-any important techniques in rolling the actual sushi

i plan to start making vegetable sushi first (will prob go with cucumber, avocado, sweet potato) and then start going to my local seafood market with a nice sushi-grade fish selection once i gain some confidence.

oh, and feel free to post your experiences (positive or not) with making sushi at home. do you think it's worth it?
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Old 02-09-2010, 04:44 PM shabubu is offline  
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MooK
 
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I've made avocado and carrot/ginger onigiri using a short grain japanese rice with vinegar, sugar and salt. It was the only brand the local asian market had (that wasn't in excess.) Worked out pretty good. You can buy sushi mats at Meijer around here.
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Old 02-09-2010, 06:08 PM MooK is offline  
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this is going to sound terrible but it's teh only way i've made good sushi and i've tried a few times.

go to the most oriental supermarket you know of in your area. go the rice aisle (yes, it's a whole aisle) ask someone there perusing rice what the best type is for sushi - profit.

repeat for seaweed. the mat is a mat with plastic wrapped over it - you can't screw that up.

alternatively you can ask an asian friend ^_^

when you're actually preparing it you'll want to NOT use too much rice, it's suprising how little rice you actually need, otherwise it's a rice roll which = fail
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Old 02-09-2010, 06:22 PM Dongboy is offline  
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beavens
 
you really dont need a mat - not for normal 'nori on the outside' handrolls.

the most important thing you can have is a nice sharp knife.

as for ingredients, you can get most of the stuff at a normal grocery store: cucumber, avocado, peppers, shrimp, tuna, salmon

yeah, the fish wont be on the same level as sashimi you can get at a restaurant, but it does the job.

mix and match and experiment.. ive been doing the basics for a few years and the only downside is spending 3-4 hours making it.

but having 20 rolls or so is pretty sweet
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Old 02-10-2010, 11:50 AM beavens is offline  
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shabubu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MooK View Post
I've made avocado and carrot/ginger onigiri using a short grain japanese rice with vinegar, sugar and salt. It was the only brand the local asian market had (that wasn't in excess.) Worked out pretty good. You can buy sushi mats at Meijer around here.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tongboy View Post
this is going to sound terrible but it's teh only way i've made good sushi and i've tried a few times.

go to the most oriental supermarket you know of in your area. go the rice aisle (yes, it's a whole aisle) ask someone there perusing rice what the best type is for sushi - profit.

repeat for seaweed. the mat is a mat with plastic wrapped over it - you can't screw that up.

alternatively you can ask an asian friend ^_^

when you're actually preparing it you'll want to NOT use too much rice, it's suprising how little rice you actually need, otherwise it's a rice roll which = fail


i guess that means i'm going to have to go to an asian market

and thanks for the tips
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Old 02-10-2010, 03:38 PM shabubu is offline  
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Butthole Eliminator
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tongboy View Post
this is going to sound terrible but it's teh only way i've made good sushi and i've tried a few times.

go to the most oriental supermarket you know of in your area. go the rice aisle (yes, it's a whole aisle) ask someone there perusing rice what the best type is for sushi - profit.

repeat for seaweed. the mat is a mat with plastic wrapped over it - you can't screw that up.

alternatively you can ask an asian friend ^_^

when you're actually preparing it you'll want to NOT use too much rice, it's suprising how little rice you actually need, otherwise it's a rice roll which = fail

sure.. ask an asian because all asians know everything about sushi. just like how every asian knows martial arts
Old 02-10-2010, 04:30 PM Butthole Eliminator is offline  
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MooK
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shabubu View Post
i guess that means i'm going to have to go to an asian market

and thanks for the tips

Better if you have a Japanese market. Slim pickings for that in Michigan.
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Old 02-10-2010, 04:35 PM MooK is offline  
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Sf_J
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Short grain rice, if you're at a japanese or korean market it almost all is short grain or pearl rice. I like Nishiki brand. Rinse the rice in cool water because it's often coated with talc and this prevents getting the right stickiness. after rinsing use equal parts cold water to rice in a heavy bottomed pot with a tight fitting lid.(2 cups is a good amount to feed 2-4 people) Bring this to a boil and then cover and turn the heat down to a low simmer. DO NOT lift the lid or stir the rice. leave it alone. take it off the heat after 15 minutes and let it sit for another 15 minutes before you lift the lid.

you can buy a powdered sushi seasoning that's fairly popular :


but I find it rather sweet and prefer to make my own, fortunately it's as simple as can be. for 2 cups of dry rice measure I do 6 tbsp rice vinegar (unseasoned, just regular) + 2 tbsp white granulated sugar + 1 teaspoon salt. You can microwave this for about 30 seconds to dissolve the sugar and salt.

Transfer the rice to a large plastic bowl (glass gets sticky and metal can affect the taste) using a rice paddle:

paddle and mat shown here:


sprinkle the warm rice with your vinegar mixture and mix well. Use light folding/fluffing motions instead of stirring. This will help cool the rice and prevents mushy rice. The grains should be firm and hold shape but sticky. Some people encourage fanning the rice too if it's not cooling down fast enough.

I cover the bamboo mat tightly with saran wrap as it makes clean up easier. For both handrolls and long rolls I cut the nori in half, long way. for handrolls you don't need the mat. just place rice on about 1/3 of the nori on one end, and place scant filling on top of the rice and roll into a cone shape. It helps to have a bowl of cool water to dip your fingers in to keep them moist and prevent the rice from sticking to your hands. you can also lightly moisten the outer edge of the nori to seal it together. For long rolls place half a sheet of nori on the bottom of the mat, lightly press down the rice covering all but about 1/2 inch of the bottom edge of the sheet (this will make rolling it tight easier). I prefer the nori on the inside usually, so then you flip the rice side down on the mat, sprinkle some sesame seeds on the rice first if you like the crunch. place your filling 1/2 inch from the bottom edge of the nori and start rolling/folding. As you roll up, press down lightly with your fingers to make sure the filling is tucked in and pull the mat up and off the roll as you go. The longroll should overlap and seal. Once it's all rolled up you can use the mat to shape it into a squared log and squeeze it lightly to make sure the roll stays tight and intact when you cut into it.

A lot of sushi places use a thin layer of mayonnaise inside longrolls to help it all stick together. Try mixing a little dill and lemon into mayo for cucumber rolls. And chopped tempura shrimp mixed lightly with mayo and sriacha hot sauce makes a really good filling that appeal to those who are squeamish about raw fish.
Old 02-10-2010, 05:07 PM Sf_J is offline  
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I bought this book. Pretty good basics in it

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Old 02-12-2010, 09:53 AM K0ll is offline  
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donniedoritos
 
I make eggrolls and springrolls all the time, it's pretty much the same thing. It's easier than you think it is and it's worth it for the price/food you get

I'm asian so I use the regular white rice I eat everyday. Just don't cook it too moist and make sure you throw some rice vinegar and mix it in when it's done cooking. Those bamboo mats help, but it's not necessary

You wanna get fish that doesn't smell at all. I'm not sure what kind of asian marts everyone else has, but unless it's a special japanese store, don't plan on eating any raw fish. The non japanese, asian markets here suck ass for raw fish haha, but then it's not their niche so be careful when you go shopping. For the seaweed just experiment with any, it's cheap and there are tons of them. If they have resealable bags, get those cause they help a lot if you can't finish all the seaweed

If I were you I'd get tuna or salmon with your vegetable sushi. Depending how your rolling skills are, it's easy to butcher up a sushi roll, but they're sitll edible even if it looks like shit. Just eat it like a burrito , just think of it as a hand roll, but not cone shape. For a typical sushi night, we usually buy ~$10 of both salmon and tuna, fake crab meat, cucumbers, guacamole, and a tub of masago, those small orange fish eggs. That lets you make tuna rolls, salmon rolls and California rolls

We half the cucumbers, take out the seeds and then cut them lengthwise in long pinky width slices. The fish usually comes in a whole filet and we cut it in long pieces just like the cucumber. The less smaller pieces you make, the better. Half the guacamole and slice them in long pieces just like how an orange comes out. Follow the instructions sf_j listed and you're set

... it's been a whole since I've done sushi, this thread is making me want to do sushi night
Old 02-12-2010, 02:35 PM donniedoritos is offline  
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shabubu
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sf_J View Post
Short grain rice, if you're at a japanese or korean market it almost all is short grain or pearl rice. I like Nishiki brand. Rinse the rice in cool water because it's often coated with talc and this prevents getting the right stickiness. after rinsing use equal parts cold water to rice in a heavy bottomed pot with a tight fitting lid.(2 cups is a good amount to feed 2-4 people) Bring this to a boil and then cover and turn the heat down to a low simmer. DO NOT lift the lid or stir the rice. leave it alone. take it off the heat after 15 minutes and let it sit for another 15 minutes before you lift the lid.

you can buy a powdered sushi seasoning that's fairly popular :


but I find it rather sweet and prefer to make my own, fortunately it's as simple as can be. for 2 cups of dry rice measure I do 6 tbsp rice vinegar (unseasoned, just regular) + 2 tbsp white granulated sugar + 1 teaspoon salt. You can microwave this for about 30 seconds to dissolve the sugar and salt.

Transfer the rice to a large plastic bowl (glass gets sticky and metal can affect the taste) using a rice paddle:

paddle and mat shown here:


sprinkle the warm rice with your vinegar mixture and mix well. Use light folding/fluffing motions instead of stirring. This will help cool the rice and prevents mushy rice. The grains should be firm and hold shape but sticky. Some people encourage fanning the rice too if it's not cooling down fast enough.

I cover the bamboo mat tightly with saran wrap as it makes clean up easier. For both handrolls and long rolls I cut the nori in half, long way. for handrolls you don't need the mat. just place rice on about 1/3 of the nori on one end, and place scant filling on top of the rice and roll into a cone shape. It helps to have a bowl of cool water to dip your fingers in to keep them moist and prevent the rice from sticking to your hands. you can also lightly moisten the outer edge of the nori to seal it together. For long rolls place half a sheet of nori on the bottom of the mat, lightly press down the rice covering all but about 1/2 inch of the bottom edge of the sheet (this will make rolling it tight easier). I prefer the nori on the inside usually, so then you flip the rice side down on the mat, sprinkle some sesame seeds on the rice first if you like the crunch. place your filling 1/2 inch from the bottom edge of the nori and start rolling/folding. As you roll up, press down lightly with your fingers to make sure the filling is tucked in and pull the mat up and off the roll as you go. The longroll should overlap and seal. Once it's all rolled up you can use the mat to shape it into a squared log and squeeze it lightly to make sure the roll stays tight and intact when you cut into it.

A lot of sushi places use a thin layer of mayonnaise inside longrolls to help it all stick together. Try mixing a little dill and lemon into mayo for cucumber rolls. And chopped tempura shrimp mixed lightly with mayo and sriacha hot sauce makes a really good filling that appeal to those who are squeamish about raw fish.

fuck, i wish i had read this thread a few hours ago

so i went right into making the rice as soon as i got home from work. i got the cooking of the rice correctly (washed it in cold water, boiled the water, let it sit for 15 mins covered afterwards). then i added rice vinegar, but only added rice vinegar. i guess this is where i kind of messed up since the rice tasted a little off. the consistency wasn't bad though, perhaps just a little too sticky.

also, i used an entire sheet of nori for one roll and put way too much rice on and little filler, making it like a giant rice roll with small pieces of avocado thank god for soy sauce and wasabi

i'm thinking the lack of sugar and salt from the rice probably didnt help, and i now know to use less nori and less rice.

oh, and the fucking rice sticking to my hands was ridiculous at first. thanks for the tip on the cold water . i wasted a decent amount of rice simply because i couldnt get it off my hands

was a nice experience (albeit a pain in the ass to clean up after), i will definitely follow these tips next time.

bonnie ftw
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Old 02-12-2010, 04:38 PM shabubu is offline  
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