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tobrien
 
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What's the scientific reasoning for somebody being warm-natured of cold-natured?

I'm just curious what the reason or causes would be that would make somebody warm natured or cold natured?

I mean, do our body temps vary from person to person slightly? or does it have to do with body fat? can somebody explain this?
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Old 07-26-2008, 11:42 AM tobrien is offline  
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Sodalason
 
Are you are talking about personality specifically?
Old 07-26-2008, 11:56 AM Sodalason is offline  
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howdytest
 
Your question is incredibly confusing...

but avg body temp is 98.6 F give or take a few tenths. Body fat is an insulator so that will affect how you give and receive changes in temp, but it has nothing to do with your core temp.
Old 07-26-2008, 12:30 PM howdytest is offline  
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Xtreme Panda
 
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I'm a skinny guy with a fast metabolism. I get cold really easy and I can't tolerate the heat.
Old 07-26-2008, 12:49 PM Xtreme Panda is offline  
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Pokeman Master
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i once heard that the climate of a person's birthplace determines their sweat glands bla bla bla, i'm not sure if that's a) true or b) relevant, but interesting to ponder
Old 07-26-2008, 07:36 PM Pokeman Master is offline  
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Dominion
 
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i think the question at hand really is that you seem to think that there is some correlation between body fat/mass and your state of mind.

Logically, it's a poor correlation to make.

Try rephrasing your original question.
Old 07-27-2008, 01:14 AM Dominion is offline  
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RiderOnTheStorm
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If you're talking about purely body temperature, core body temperature rarely deviates much from 98.6, and if it does it's indicative of larger issues. People who constantly have cold hands or warm hands or feel warmer or colder to the touch than normal have problems with circulation, too little or too much. That's why medical examiners take temperatures from the liver, usually.

edit: the ones I've seen do it anyway.
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Old 07-27-2008, 01:51 AM RiderOnTheStorm is offline  
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Mikiri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RiderOnTheStorm View Post
If you're talking about purely body temperature, core body temperature rarely deviates much from 98.6, and if it does it's indicative of larger issues. People who constantly have cold hands or warm hands or feel warmer or colder to the touch than normal have problems with circulation, too little or too much. That's why medical examiners take temperatures from the liver, usually.

edit: the ones I've seen do it anyway.

I've always been around 97.6 or so for my normal temperature. Doctors have never mentioned anything about my circulation being off Am I doomed?
Old 07-27-2008, 03:32 AM Mikiri is offline  
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RiderOnTheStorm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikiri View Post
I've always been around 97.6 or so for my normal temperature. Doctors have never mentioned anything about my circulation being off Am I doomed?

DOOOOOOMED.

I think the change needs to be more radical than a degree off. I don't know for sure though, I'm just going off old bio and anatomy courses. Nor am I a doctor. Best not to take what I say here as gospel.

Either that or you have 24 hours.
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Old 07-27-2008, 05:09 AM RiderOnTheStorm is offline  
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jkoebel
 
This is a terribly worded question.

There's some variance generally, though. 98.6 is the running average, but I typically run around 98.9-99 all the time. It's odd.

I knew a kid once who had some sort of growth on his adrenal gland, not a malignancy but like a cyst or something. Whatever it was, pressed on it enough to keep it basically secreting things all the time. His options were either terribly invasive surgery with a huge risk of dying on the table or becoming a vegetable, or living with a normal resting body temperature right around 100-101, sky-high heart rate, and the prospect of dying of accelerated aging before he turned 50. That can't be fun. He took the second choice.
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Old 07-27-2008, 07:15 AM jkoebel is offline  
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springwater
 
I think I know what you're getting at so I'll try to help... I seem to believe were you grow up climate wise will overall play a part in someone's favor to heat or the cold. Also race has a play. Basic baby!
Old 07-27-2008, 07:47 AM springwater is offline  
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Macktheknife
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jkoebel View Post
This is a terribly worded question.

There's some variance generally, though. 98.6 is the running average, but I typically run around 98.9-99 all the time. It's odd.

I run consistent 97.5s when I'm healthy, and my sister is in the 99.3s. This has been corroborated at doctor's visits when we were children. Our pediatrician had no explanation for it
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Old 07-27-2008, 11:02 AM Macktheknife is offline  
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ridgid
 
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The higher your body temperature the harder it is for your body to perform the chemical reactions necessary to sustain your life. This is why when you are really sick you get a fever since its your bodies way of trying to stop whatever infection you have from replicating any more.
Old 07-27-2008, 11:03 AM ridgid is offline  
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sir tex
 
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I think it has more to do with where one is currently living, and how long they've been living there. I can go outside right now and it's 90% humidity with temp of 100 degrees, feels like 115, and sweat a little bit after a few minutes. If there is a breeze, I won't even sweat. I'm used to it, I've grown up here for 21 years and my body thinks it's a normal temperature. I adapt. Now, take someone older who has lived in Maine all their life, and they'd probably die from heat stroke in two hours or less, because their aging bodies cannot readily adapt as well as others can.

This is all theorycraft though, and I have no scientific evidence to back any of this.
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Old 07-27-2008, 11:53 AM sir tex is offline  
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RiotingNerd
 
^^ your blood naturally thins or thickens depending on temperature. IIRC it takes a few days to become fully acclimatized to an unusually high or low temperature.
Old 07-27-2008, 12:56 PM RiotingNerd is offline  
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