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Bernie Mac
 
Cutting non 90 degree angles (Hardwood flooring install)




I am thinking about installing hardwood flooring in this room and it seems pretty straightforward, just cut the wood as needed to fit between the ends of the room. The only part that is worrying me is the rounded base of the steps.

My concerns:

1. The rounded edges... whats the best way to measure and cut them
2. The lack of molding to cover up the rough area that I am cutting


anyone ever tackle this before?
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Last edited by Bernie Mac; 09-01-2008 at 09:00 PM..
Old 09-01-2008, 08:23 PM Bernie Mac is offline  
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The Spyder
 
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Yes and its a bit difficult to explain.
I just got back from a 6h trip, brain is fried, will explain tomorrow.
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Old 09-01-2008, 08:59 PM The Spyder is offline  
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Dongboy
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jigsaw
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Old 09-01-2008, 10:07 PM Dongboy is offline  
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k1114
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Doing it with a miter saw you want to cut it like a comb, and then break off each of the teeth one by one (similar to cutting curved shapes out of tile). You can then use the blade to smooth off any roughness, or even sand the edges. I assume there will be some overlap though, so it shouldn't matter a lot.
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Old 09-01-2008, 10:16 PM k1114 is offline  
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SoulkeepHL
 
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Originally Posted by Tongboy View Post
jigsaw

Or coping saw. Tape a pencil to a block of wood and offset the piece you need to cut the curve into and then just trace the curvature of the step with the block/pencil onto the board (or buy one of those fancy pin depth set things that you press into the shape and then trace onto the wood, the hell are those things called anyways?).
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Old 09-01-2008, 10:30 PM SoulkeepHL is offline  
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HybridPyro
 
The pros would just use a table saw to cut the radius, but just use a jigsaw.
Old 09-01-2008, 10:32 PM HybridPyro is offline  
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tmoney1876
 
How would you use a table saw to cut the radius? Like k1114 said?
Old 09-02-2008, 01:55 AM tmoney1876 is offline  
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Grazehell
 
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You could mark the wood(or get your angles) for cutting with a compass. Its simple. You lay the piece of wood next to the step flat like you were going to lay it out the floor, then you take the compass and run the edge with the pencil(Carbon/marking apparatus) along hardwood and the other edge along with step.
This is how carpenters do it.
Old 09-02-2008, 03:54 AM Grazehell is offline  
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Pigs
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if you're brain hurts and you can't figure out the angle, use a piece of paper as a stencil.

Cut it with scissors and put it up against the angle so it fits, then trace it onto the piece of wood.
Old 09-02-2008, 04:42 AM Pigs is offline  
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DigitalMocking
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coping saw if you're cheap, jigsaw if you're cheap, bandsaw if you have money to throw away.
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Old 09-02-2008, 06:26 AM DigitalMocking is offline  
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Bernie Mac
 
Thanks for the tips...


If I am also replacing the carpet on the steps (including that last big step that comes in contact with the future hardwood, which makes more sense to do last? I am assuming do hardwood first, and carpet next.
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Old 09-02-2008, 05:12 PM Bernie Mac is offline  
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HybridPyro
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tmoney1876 View Post
How would you use a table saw to cut the radius? Like k1114 said?
Either that, or just by slowly holding the board and cutting the angle with it. It is possible, but I've never tried it and probably wouldn't.
Old 09-02-2008, 11:37 PM HybridPyro is offline  
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HybridPyro
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bernie Mac View Post
If I am also replacing the carpet on the steps (including that last big step that comes in contact with the future hardwood, which makes more sense to do last? I am assuming do hardwood first, and carpet next.
Yes. Pull the carpet off and put the hardwood up to it, then replace the carpet. Or, better yet, do that one step in hardwood, since it would blend with the room better.
Old 09-02-2008, 11:38 PM HybridPyro is offline  
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Dongboy
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HybridPyro View Post
The pros would just use a table saw to cut the radius, but just use a jigsaw.

the pros would just use a table saw and cut rough angles and have it hidden by the molding
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Old 09-03-2008, 09:32 AM Dongboy is offline  
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#14  

bizzz111
 
rebuild the stair so it's square, then do as mentioned above and cover stair with hardwood.
Old 09-03-2008, 09:29 PM bizzz111 is offline  
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